Michael Pittman

"Representational art is largely an exercise in developing a somewhat rigid blueprint and then following it to completion. Problems are largely solved before the first brushstroke. I am most comfortable in the realm of abstraction where problems must be solved as they occur from beginning to end. I enjoy the ongoing tension of that approach. Visually, I am not inspired by the shiny and new. I'm drawn to structures that are weathered, abandoned and in decay, their stories revealed in layers stripped away by the ravages of time and neglect.

I am at my best in the studio when I have no plan other than to show up and attack the canvas, feeling my way rather than calculating it, inviting happy accidents by smearing paint and moving it with stiff brushes, trowels and sticks, then sanding and scraping until the painting's personality reveals itself. That is when I step away, sit and stare, plotting how to refine and bring order to the chaos, brushing over areas that displease me, adding to others to make them more interesting. Finally, I often endeavor to finish off the composition by cutting in with black shapes and lines. In a sense, the black is an armature applied over the work rather than under it." -M. Pittman